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Eve
Seth was the third son of Adam and Eve and brother of Cain and Abel
Enos or Enosh (“mortal man”) is the first son of Seth
Kenan (Qenan, Kainan or Cainan) was a Biblical patriarch
Mahalale (Mahalalel, Mahalaleel, or Mihlaiel) was a Biblical patriarch
Jared or Jered (‘descent’ or ‘to descend’), fifth-generation descendant of Adam and Eve.
Enoch is a figure in biblical literature.
Methuselah (“Man of the dart/spear”, or alternatively “his death shall bring judgment”) is the man reported to have lived the longest at the age of 969 in the Hebrew Bible Lamech was a patriarch in the genealogies of Adam in the Book of Genesis.
Noah was the tenth and last of the pre-flood Patriarchs. 
Japheth is one of the sons of Noah in the Abrahamic tradition.
Magog is the second of the seven sons of Japheth mentioned in the Table of Nations
Bathath Farssaidh (Baath or Baath mac Magog), son of Magog (Irish version)
Phoeniusa Farsaidh (Fénius Farsaid), son of Bathath Farssaidh
Niul Nemnach, son of Phoeniusa Farsaidh, King of Scythia
Gaodhal Glas, son of Niul Nemnach, King of Scythia
Asruth / Esasru, son of Gaodhal Glas
Sruth / Srú, son of Asruth / Esasru
Eibhear Scutt, son of Sruth / Srú
Boamhain, son of Heber “the Scot”
Oghaman, King of Scythia, son of Boamhain, king of Scythia
Tait, King of Scythia, son of Oghaman, King of Scythia
Agnon, son of Tait, King of Scythia
Lamhfionn “Bloodhand” Glunfionn, son of Agnon
Heber Glunfionn, King of Getulia, son of Lamhfionn “Bloodhand” Glunfionn
Agnan Fionn, King of Gothia, son of Heber Glunfionn, King of Getulia
Febric Glas / Ermhear Glas, King of Gothia, son of Agnan Fionn, King of Gothia
Nenuall, King of Gothia, son of Febric Glas / Ermhear Glas, King of Gothia
Nuadhad, King of Gothia, son of Nenuall, King of Gothia
Alladh, King of Gothia, son of Nuadhad, King of Gothia
Arcadh, King of Gothia, son of Alladh, King of Gothia
Deaghata, King Gothia, son of Arcadh, King of Gothia
Brath, King of Gothia, son of Deaghata, King of Geulia

Breogán is a character in the Lebor Gabála Érenn, a medieval Christian pseudo-history of Ireland and the Irish (or Gaels). He is described as a king of Galicia and an ancestor of the Gaels.

Bile is a character in the Lebor Gabála Érenn, a medieval Christian pseudo-history of Ireland and the Irish (or Gaels), and in the genealogies of John O’Hart based on this tradition. He is described as a king of Galicia, an ancestor of the Gaels, the son of Breogan, and the father of Milesius.

Míl Espáine or Míl Espáne (later Latinized as Milesius) is the mythical ancestor of the final inhabitants of Ireland, the “sons of Míl” or Milesians, who represent the vast majority of the Irish Gaels. His father was Bile, son of Breogan.

Érimón, son of Míl Espáine (and great-grandson of Breoghan, king of Celtic Galicia), according to medieval Irish legends and historical traditions, was one of the chieftains who took part in the Milesian invasion of Ireland, which conquered the island from the Tuatha Dé Danann, and one of the first Milesian High Kings.

Irial Fáid (“the prophet”), the youngest son of Érimón by his wife Tea, according to medieval Irish legends and historical traditions, became High King of Ireland

Ethriel, son of Íriel Fáid, according to medieval Irish legends and historical traditions, succeeded his father as High King of Ireland.

Follach, son of Ethriel

Tigernmas, son of Follach, son of Ethriel, a descendant of Érimón, was, according to medieval Irish legend and historical traditions, an early High King of Ireland.

Fíachu Labhrainne, son of Smirgoll, son of Enboth, son of Tigernmas, was, according to medieval Irish legend and historical tradition, a High King of Ireland.

Óengus Olmucaid (or Aengus Olmucada), son of Fíachu Labrainne, was, according to medieval Irish legend and historical tradition, a High King of Ireland.

Maen, Maoin, Maon or Main), son of Óengus Olmucaid, who, according to medieval legend and tradition, was a High King of Ireland

Rothechtaid, son of Maen, son of Óengus Olmucaid, was, according to medieval Irish legend and historical tradition, a High King of Ireland.

Demal mac Rothechtaid, was the son of Rothechtaid mac Main, who, according to medieval legend and tradition, was a High King of Ireland.

Dian mac Demal, son of Demal mac Rothechtaid

Sírna Sáeglach (“the long-lived”), son of Dian mac Demal, son of Demal mac Rothechtaid, son of Rothechtaid mac Main, was, according to medieval Irish legend and historical tradition, a High King of Ireland.

Ailill Olcháin (Olioll Olchain) is a legendary King of Ireland.

Gíallchad, the son of Ailill Olcháin, son of Sírna Sáeglach, was, according to medieval Irish legend and historical tradition, the 37th High King of Ireland.

Nuadu Finn Fáil (Nuadu the Fair of Fál – a poetic name for Ireland), son of Gíallchad, was, according to medieval Irish legend and historical tradition, a High King of Ireland

Áedan Glas, son of Nuadu Finn Fáil

Siomón Brecc (“the speckled, spotted, ornamented”), son of Áedan Glas, son of Nuadu Finn Fáil, was, according to medieval Irish legend and historical tradition, a High King of Ireland.

Muiredach Bolgrach, son of Siomón Brecc, was, according to medieval Irish legend and historical tradition, a High King of Ireland.

Fíachu Tolgrach, son of Muiredach Bolgrach, was a legendary High King of Ireland, according to some medieval and early modern Irish sources.

Dui Ladrach, son of Fíachu Tolgrach, was, according to medieval Irish legend and historical tradition, a High King of Ireland.

Eochu Buadach, son of Dui Ladrach, was, according to some redactions or versions of Lebor Gabála Érenn, a High King of Ireland.

Úgaine Mór (Hugony, “the great”), son of Eochu Buadach, son of Dui Ladrach, was, according to medieval Irish legend and historical tradition, the 66th High King of Ireland.

Cobthach Cóel Breg, son of Úgaine Mor, was, according to medieval Irish legend and historical tradition, a High King of Ireland.

Meilge Molbthach (“the praiseworthy”), son of Cobthach Cóel Breg, was, according to medieval Irish legend and historical tradition, a High King of Ireland.

Irereo Fáthach (“the wise”), son of Meilge Molbthach, was, according to medieval Irish legend and historical tradition, a High King of Ireland.

Connla Cáem (“the beautiful”), also known as Connla Cruaidchelgach (“bloody blade”), son of Irereo, was, according to medieval Irish legend and historical tradition, a High King of Ireland.

Ailill Caisfiaclach (“having crooked/hateful teeth”), son of Connla Cáem, was, according to medieval Irish legends and historical traditions, a High King of Ireland.

Eochaid (or Eochu) Ailtlethan (“broad blade”), son of Ailill Caisfiaclach, was, according to medieval Irish legends and historical traditions, a High King of Ireland.

Óengus Tuirmech Temrach, son of Eochaid Ailtlethan, was, according to medieval Irish legend and historical tradition, a High King of Ireland.

Énna Aignech (“spirited, swift”, an epithet usually applied to horses), son of Óengus Tuirmech Temrach, was, according to medieval Irish legend and historical tradition, a High King of Ireland.

Eochu or Eochaid Feidlech (“the enduring”), son of Finn, was, according to medieval Irish legends and historical traditions, a High King of Ireland.

Lugaid Riab nDerg (“the red-striped”) or Réoderg (“Red Sky”), son of the three findemna, triplet sons of Eochu Feidlech, and their sister Clothru was, according to medieval Irish legend and historical tradition, a High King of Ireland.

In Irish mythology the three Findemna or Finn Eamna (variously interpreted as “fair triplets” or “three fair ones of Emain Macha”) were three sons of the High King of Ireland, Eochaid Feidlech. Their names were Bres, Nár and Lothar.

They conspired to overthrow their father. The day before meeting him in battle they were visited by their sister, Clothru, who tried in vain to dissuade them from this course of action. They were childless, so for fear that they might die without an heir Clothru took all three of them to bed, conceiving Lugaid Riab nDerg, son of the three Findemna. Lugaid later became High King of Ireland, so that Clothru’s incest preserved the line of succession to the high kingship.

Crimthann Nia Náir (nephew of Nár), son of Lugaid Riab nDerg, was, according to medieval Irish legend and historical tradition, a High King of Ireland.

Feradach Finnfechtnach (“fair-blessed”), son of Crimthann Nia Náir, was, according to medieval Irish legend and historical tradition, a High King of Ireland.

Fiacha Finnolach, son of Feradach Finnfechtnach, was, according to medieval Irish legend and historical tradition, a High King of Ireland.

Túathal Techtmar (“the legitimate”), son of Fíachu Finnolach, was a High King of Ireland, according to medieval Irish legend and historical tradition.

Fedlimid Rechtmar (“the lawful, legitimate” or “the passionate, furious”) or Rechtaid (“the judge, lawgiver”) son of Tuathal Techtmar, was, according to medieval Irish legend and historical tradition, a High King of Ireland.

Conn Cétchathach (“of the Hundred Battles”), son of Fedlimid Rechtmar, was, according to medieval Irish legendary and annalistic sources, a High King of Ireland

Art mac Cuinn (“son of Conn”), also known as Art Óenfer (literally “one man”, used in the sense of “lone”, “solitary”, or “only son”), was, according to medieval Irish legend and historical tradition, a High King of Ireland.

Cormac mac Airt (son of Art), also known as Cormac ua Cuinn (grandson of Conn) or Cormac Ulfada (long beard), was, according to medieval Irish legend and historical tradition, a High King of Ireland.

Cairbre Lifechair (“lover of the Liffey”), son of Cormac mac Airt and Eithne Ollamda ingen Dúnlaing, was, according to medieval Irish legend and historical tradition, a High King of Ireland

Fiacha Sraibhtine, son of Cairbre Lifechair and Aine nic Finn, was, according to medieval Irish legend and historical tradition, a High King of Ireland.

Muiredach Tirech, son of Fiacha Sraibhtine and Aoife of Gall-Gaidheal, was a legendary High King of Ireland of the fourth century – 122nd High King of Ireland.
He gained power by exiling the three Collas, who had killed his father. The Collas later returned and tried to provoke him into trying to kill them. When he didn’t, they entered his service and led his armies. He was overthrown by Cáelbad. “In the beginning of the fourth century, Muiredeach Tireach, High King of Ireland, directed his nephews, the three Collas, to face north and win sword land for themselves. On the ruins of the old kingdom of Uladh they founded a new kingdom—of Airgíalla—which was henceforth for nearly a thousand years to play an important part in the history of Ireland, and which was possessed afterwards by their descendants, the MacMahons, O’Hanlons, O’Carrolls, and Maguires.”

According to the Lebor Gabála Érenn and its derivative works Muiredach Tírech was the father of Eochaid Mugmedón, High King of Ireland, and therefore grandfather of Niall of the Nine Hostages and ancestor of the Uí Néill and Connachta dynasties.

– the following Ó Ruairc pedigree is reproduced from the older Irish genealogies

An O’Ruairc Pedigree

(1) Eochu Mugmedón, died after 360 AD, son of Muiredeach Tireach
(2) Brión – ancestor of the Ui Briuin of Connacht
(3) Duach Galach
(4) Éogan Sreibh
(5) Muiredach Mál *
(6) Fergus
(7) Fergna
(8) Aedh Find
(9) Scanlan
(10) Crimhthann
(11) Fedlim *
(12) Blaithmac *
(13) Baithin
(14) Donchadh
(15) Dubh Dothra   (obit. 743)
(16) Cernach   (or Cernachan)
(17) Sellachan
(18) Tigernán   (obit. betw. Bet. 888 – 892)
(19) Ruarc mac Tighernáin   (from whom the surname O’Rourke derives)
(20) Art * mac Ruairc
(21) O Ruairc, Sean Ferghal, King of Connacht: 956-964/7
(22) O Ruairc, Aedh – died abt 1015
(23) O Ruairc, Art Oirdnide (Uallach), King of Connacht: c.1030-1046
(24) O Ruairc, Niall – died abt 1047
(25) O Ruairc, Ualgharg – died abt 1085


 

Fergal (967, Sen Fergal, King of Connacht)                                                          Aedh?
__|________________________________________________________________________________                  _|_
  |                                                                               |                   |
Aedh (1014)                                                          Art an caileach (1031?)     Niall (1000)
__|__________________                                                            _|_                 _|_             
  |                                                                               |                   |
Art oirdnidhe (1046, Art uallach, King of Connacht)                   Donnchadh cael (1084)       Tighernán                             
__|__________________________________________________________________                                _|_
  |                                        |                        |                                 |
Aedh (1087, King of Connacht)     Donnchad dearg (1039)      Niall (1047)                        Cathal (1059)
__|_                                                 _______________|___________________             _|_
  |                                                  |                                 |              |
Domnall                                   Aedh an Gilla Braite (1066)           Ualgarg (1085)   Domnall (1078)
 _|_                                                                   ________________|_______
  |                                                                    |                      |
Aedh (this line from Rawlinson)                                     Tighernán              Domnall 
    ___________________________________________________________________|_       	     _|_
     |                                                                                        | 
  Domnall (1102, King of Connacht)                                                        Donnchad 
    _|____________________________                             _______________________________|________ 
     |                           |                             |                    |                 |
Fergal (1157)        Donnchad Gilla Bruide (1125)      Tighernán mór (1172)    Aedh (1123?)         Niall
  _|______________              _|_                           _|_                  _|_
   |       |                     |                             |                    |
Amlaíb  Domnall (1207)      Aedh (1176)                  Máelsechlann          Cathal liath
(1184)    _|__                  _|_                           _|_                  _|___________________ 
           |                     |                             |                    |                  |
          Art (1210)        Donnchadh óg                  Aedh (1187)          Ualgarg (1231)   Domnall mhatail 
   ________|________            _|____                                  ____________|_                _|_
   |               |             |                                      |           |                  |
Amlaíb (1258)   Art bec      Cathal riabach (1236)              Sitric (1257)     Aedh     Tighernán na corradh
  _|_____________ (1260)        _|___________                                      _|_                _|_
   |            |                           |                                       |                  |              
Conchobar      Domnall                  Art (1275)                           Tighernán (1274)   Conchobar (1257)
buidhe (1273)  carrach (1311)               |__________                                               _|_                  
  _______________|____________                        |                                                |
  |                          |                      Amlaíb (1307)                               Domnall (1259)
Ualgarg mór (1346)    Flaithbhertach (1352)      
__|________________________________________________________________________
  |                      |                          |                     |                                            
Aedh bán (1352)    Tadhg na gCaor (1376)    Gilla Crist (1378)    Tighernán mór (1418)
_________________________|_         ______________________________________|_________________________________
 |                       |           |              |                     |                 |              |
Art (1424)     Lochlann (1458)  Tighernán óg    Aedh buidhe (1419)    Tadhg (1435)        Donnchadh    Donnchadh
                  _|_            ____|___                    _____________|________       bacagh (1445)  losc
                   |                 |                       |                    |                     (1468)
                Eoghan          Donnchadh  (1449)       Tighernán óg (1468)     Domnall (1468)
   (O'Rourkes of Cloncorick)         |                       |                            
                             Feidhlimidh (1500)           Eóghan (1528)
                                     |                       |        
                             Feidhlimidh (1536)      Brian ballach mór (1562)
                                                             |
                           (O'Rourkes of Chartha)     Brian na múrtha (1591)
                                                    (O'Rourkes of Dromahair) 

Notes on the names highlighted in bold:
The earliest portion of the above lineage is reflected in the 12th century Book of Leinster, that is, Ualgarg son of Niall son of Art son of Aedh son of Fergal. The full text suggests that a Tigernan was a son of Donnchad, son of Domnall, son of Ualgarg (above noted). This Tigernan would logically be Tighernán mór, who died in 1172, and this pedigree is also reflected in Francis Byrne’s work, Irish Kings and High Kings.

O’Clery’s 17th century Book of Genealogies, provides a full lineage from Fergal down to Brian na múrtha as follows:   [m = “son of “]
Briain na murthadh m Briain ballaigh m Eoghain m Tighernain m Taidhg m Tigernain moir m Ualgairg m Domnaill m Amhlaibh m Airt m Domhnaill m Ferghail m Domnaill m Tigernain m Ualghairg m Neill  m Aedha  m Airt oirdnighe m Aedha m SenFerghail.

Note on O’Clery: O’Clery erroneously adds an extra Aedha to this pedigree (see strikethrough). Earlier in the same tract, O’Clery shows the same Ualgharg m Neill as a grandson of Airt oirdnighe. This error is also corroborated in the late 14th century Book of Ballymote, and in the 15th century An Leabhar Donn.

Notes on the Kings of Connacht:
The four Ua Ruaic kings of Connacht are noted in the Irish Annals; and in “A poem on the Kings of Connacht” (manuscript sources: MS. Rawlinson B 502 [facs. p. 165]; Z Celt Philol 9 (1913) 461–69). In the translated poem the four are cited as:

  • Fergal son of Ruarc from the Rige, who seized all the country round through battle-rage.     (Note: Fergal was a grandson of Ruarc)
  • Art grandson of Ruarc of the royal seat; Art the Fair of the land of Codal.     (Note: Art oirdinte, righ Connacht, son of Aedh)
  • Aed son of Art, seized on Sart of lasting valour.     (Note: Aedh, righ Connacht, son of Art oirdinte)
  • Domnall son of Tigernan the Silent.     (Note: Domnall, rige Conacht, son of Tigernan son of Ualgarg)

(the additional notes attached to the above kings of Connacht are taken from the genealogies of Ballymote, Leabhar Donn, and O’Clery)

Notes on Linea Antiqua and O’Harts Pedigrees:
Both O’Ferral and O’Hart confuse Tighernan, father of Domnall (the last O’Ruairc to be called king of Connacht), with Tighernan Mor who died in 1172. Tighernan Mor could not have had son who died in 1102 with the title of king of Connacht. Compared with earlier genealogies, O’Ferral and O’Hart also confuse Tadhg (son of Tighernán mór who died in 1418) with Tadhg na gCaor.

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~ruairc/lewis.htm

A Topographical Dictionary of Ireland, Vol. II
Samuel Lewis, London, 1837

LEITRIM (County of): a county, of which a very small portion is maritime, in the province of CONNAUGHT, bounded on the west by the counties of Sligo and Roscommon, on the south by that of Longford, on the east by those of Cavan and Fermanagh, and on the north by that of Donegal and by Donegal bay. It extends from 53° 45′ to 54° 29′ (N. Lat.) and from 7° 33′ to 8° 8′ (W. Lon.); and comprises, according to the Ordnance survey, 420,375 statute acres, of which 266,640 are cultivated land, 128,167 are unimproved mountain and bog, and 25,568 are under water. The population, in 1821, was 124,785, and in 1831, 141,303.

According to Ptolemy, this tract, together with that comprised in the counties of Fermanagh and Cavan, was occupied by the Erdini, called in Irish Ernaigh, who possessed the entire country bordering on Lough Erne. This county, together with that of Cavan and part of Fermanagh, afterwards formed the territory of Breffny or Brenny, which was divided into two principalities, of which the present county of Leitrim formed the western, under the name of Lower or West Breffny, and Hy-Briuin-Breffny, from Brian, son of Eachod, and grandson of Muredach, first king of Connaught of the Scottish race. Sometimes this county was also designated Breffny O’Ruark, 0’Rorke, 0’Roirk, or O’Rourk, from the name of the family that ruled over it from a very early period. Its subordinate divisions were Dromahaire, the present barony of the same name; Lietdrumai or Liathdromen, the modern Leitrim; Munster Eolus, or Hy Colluing, the present baronies of Carrigallen and Mohill, the principal families of which were the Maghrannals, or Mac Granells; and Hy Murragh, the modern barony of Rossclogher, of which the chiefs were the O’Murroghs, or O’Murreys. For some time after the arrival of the English, the whole was considered to form part of the ill-defined county of Roscommon: but the O’Rourks maintained an independent authority in their own territory until the middle of the 16th century. Tiernan O’Rourk, an active military chief, governed here in the latter part of the 12th century, when the princes of Connaught and Leinster combined to expel him from his territory; and Dermod Mac Murrough, the king of Leinster, taking advantage of their success, carried off his wife Dervorghal; but the expelled chieftain having applied for aid to Turlogh, supreme king of Ireland, the latter not only reinstated him in his principality, but regained him his wife. The English, soon after their arrival, in conjunction with their ally Dermod, invaded the territory of Breffny, where, however, Dermod was twice defeated, and compelled to secure his safety by a precipitate retreat. O’Rourk afterwards made an unsuccessful attack on Dublin, when in the possession of Strongbow’s forces; yet subsequently he joined Hen. II. against Roderic, king of Connaught. The line of independent chieftains of this family terminated in Brian O’Rourk, lord of Breffny and Minterolis, who, relying on the promises of Pope Sixtus V. and the king of Spain, threw off his allegiance to Queen Elizabeth; but having been forced to flee to Scotland, he was there taken prisoner and conveyed to London, where he was executed as a traitor, on which occasion it is recorded that the only favour he asked was to be hanged, after his country’s fashion, with a rope of twisted withe. His territory having escheated to the Crown, extensive grants were given to English proprietors, and, in 1565, it was erected into a county by Sir Henry Sidney, under the name of Leitrim, from its chief town. The O’Rourks ruled over several subordinate septs, the principal families of whom were the O’Murrey’s, Mac Loghlins, Mac Glanchies, and Mac Grannels, some of whose posterity still exist; the descendants of the last-named family are now called Reynolds, a corruption of the original name.

Vestiges of the remotest antiquity are not numerous: there are but two druidical altars, one within half a mile of Fena, and the other on the demesne of Letterfyan: they are called respectively by the inhabitants Leaba Dearmudi Graine, or “Darby and Graine’s bed or altar.” Fifteen religious houses are recorded to have formerly existed within the limits of the county; and there are still remains of those of Fena, Annaghduff, Clone, Kilnaille, and Ince in Lough Allen. The castles and fortified mansions were also very numerous; those which still remain, more or less in ruin, are O’Rourk’s Castle

According to the Irish genealogical tradition, the O’Rourke pedigree traces its ancestry back to Conn Ceadchadhach (Conn of the hundred battles), whose progeny included many of the so-called High Kings (Ard Ri) of Ireland. From Conn the legendary lineage of the High Kings continued with Conn’s son Art Aonfhir (the Lonely) to his grandson Cormac MacAirt. Cormac was the father of Cairbre Liffechar (of the Liffey), who was the father of Fiachadh Sreabhthuine, who was the father of Muiredeach Tireach, who was the father of Eochach Muighmedon. From Eochcach’s son, Brión, a King of Connacht in the 4th century, descends the royal line of the Ui Briuin (the race of Brion), whose descendants were kings in the province Connacht (western Ireland) for many centuries. Brión is recorded with 24 sons, one of those being named Duach Galach. Duach is described as a common ancestor of the O’Conors, the O’Flahertys, the O’Rourkes, the O’Reillys, and other noble familes of Connacht.

According to the Irish genealogies of O’Clery, et. al., Duach (Dauí) Galach had a son named Eoghan Sreib. Eoghan’s son Muiredach Mal had a son (or brother) named Fergus. From Feargna, the son of the latter Fergus, descended the tribal group of the Uí Briúin Bréifne (the O’Rourkes and O’Reillys among others). Sometime around the 6th century Feargna is said to have migrated to the Bréifne area, although this is highly disputed. Feargna was succeeded by a son named Aedh Finn (Hugh the fair) who died about the 7th century. From Aedh’s son, Scanlan, was said to follow in order of descendancy: Crimhthann, Fedlim, Blaithmac, Baithin, Donchadh, Dubhdothra, Cernach, Sellachan, Tigernán, and finally to Ruarc, the namesake of the O’Rourke’s (et al).

Cautionary note: Francis J. Byrne in his Irish Kings and High-Kings (2nd edition, 2001) states the early “Uí Briúin pedigrees show every sign of falsification. As the dynasty was comparitively insignificant as late as the 7th century, and spread out from central Connacht in the course of the eighth, we should look for a parallel expansion of its genealogical ramifications at approximately the same date.” He goes on to state the various Uí Briúin “each trace their separate descent through lines of unrecorded or dubious ancestors to Brión and his suppositious son Dauí in the fifth century.”
Modern Irish historians agree it was not unusual for the earliest genealogies to have been crafted for political reasons, and as a means of connecting the more important septs of the day to one another.

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